A Pulitzer-Prize-winning journalist explains how your brain tricks you into making bad decisions

Decisions are the worst.

What time are you available for a phone call tomorrow? Can you sign off on this project proposal? How much pizza should we order for tomorrow’s staff meeting?

Ugh. 2 p.m.; yes; 10 pies. Done.

You might feel incredibly productive after making these decisions, simply because you checked three items off your to-do list. But efficiency isn’t the same thing as productivity, especially if you’ve just made all the wrong choices.

That’s according to Charles Duhigg, a Pulitzer-Prize-winning journalist and author of the new book, “Smarter Faster Better,” about the science of productivity.

In the book, Duhigg writes about the concept of “cognitive closure,” which psychologists describe as “the desire for a confident judgment on an issue, any confident judgment, as compared to confusion and ambiguity.” (You can test your need for cognitive closure here.)

The need for…

Read the entire article from BusinessInsider here: A Pulitzer-Prize-winning journalist explains how your brain tricks you into making bad decisions

 



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